Vinh Long travel guide | Cruise Mekong River

Vinh Long travel guide

Vinh Long travel guide

While the provincial capital of the same-named province is a medium-sized town, most of the points of interest sit in a small area in the northeast corner, where the town is bordered by the Co Chien River to the north and a wide canal to the east and it is from here that the boat trips to Cai Be floating market and the island homestays depart. This corner of town is also a popular spot for the locals to sit back, slurp coffee and scoff banh mi while the chocolate brown river waters roar past (and it does roar here). There’s also a bustling central market, with a large wet market along with a dry goods section, a bunch of gold shops and loads of eating opportunities.
It may not be the largest town in the Mekong but as a major transit hub it can be noisy and chaotic nonetheless. Escape the mayhem by heading to the riverfront, where there are plenty of cafes and restaurants. Despite a lack of in-town attractions, Vinh Long is the gateway to island life and some worthwhile sites, including Cai Be floating market, abundant orchards and rural homestays, which can be a highlight of a Mekong journey. Vinh Long is the capital of Vinh Long province and situated about midway between My Tho and Can Tho.

Compared to My Tho further downriver, the boat trips here are more affordable and the homestays offer a terrific opportunity to experience Mekong life firsthand, yet few independent travellers tend to make it here. The tours operating out of Saigon often hop, skip and jump through, combining a trip to Cai Be with a snack stop by the river, but very few people overnight here — don’t be surprised when you’re the only westerner in the town’s sole disco.

Aside from the river trips and the homestays, Ving Long isn’t screaming out with grade A tourist attractions — it’s other claim to fame, the Van Thanh Mieu pagoda was being renovated when we visited, and the museum kept such odd hours we never seemed to be around when it was open.

The Vinh Long tourist office can organise homestays and boat trips but both are significantly more expensive than organising something on a more freelance basis — stand around by the riverbank for about five seconds and don’t be surprised when a boatman edges up whispering “boat trip” to you in hushed tones. While they’re mainly trying to sell you a trip over to Cai Be, they can also organise a stay at the homestays for significantly less than what the tourist authority asks, though, as the tourist office warns, “Using an outside operator carries no insurance should very bad things happen”.

Unlike other floating markets, Cai Be operates well into the day, so if you’re in a rush, it’s feasible to arrive in Vinh Long early in the morning (say from My Tho), do a boat trip out to the market, returning to Vinh Long by early afternoon with plenty of time to push onto Can Tho. Most trips to Cai Be run for at least three hours as the trip there takes about 45 minutes each way (depending on the route taken and the boat used).

From the Vinh Long river bank, if you look to the west you can see the twin towers of the My Thuan Bridge jutting into the sky. Built with considerable financial assistance from Australia, the bridge did away with the ferries and greatly improved access to the greater Delta from Saigon — one wonders though why it is so high — perhaps the AusAID officials in Saigon wanted to be able to point out its spires from their offices.

Tags: Private 2 Days Cai Be – Vinh Long – Sa Dec – Can Tho3 days to the Floating Markets

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *